People Don't Have to Be Anything Else Wiki
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Tag: rte-wysiwyg
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'''Bern in People's Lives'''
 
'''Bern in People's Lives'''
   
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[[Hermann Hesse]]: My family and I moved here in 1912, directly following my return from a long trip of mine to the near and far east. The voyage had been sparked by a growing distance from my wife, Maria. Now that I had returned, and we had moved here, we both hoped for a fresh start. However, my marital troubles continued. At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, I volunteered to serve in the German Imperial Army. I was, at the time, 37 years old, and said that I could not sit by the fireplace while other young authors were dying on the front. I was found unfit for duty due to an eye condition, but was assigned to caring for prisoners of war. Through out the war, I promoted peace and love in my writings, a stark contrast to most writers of the time. I wrote essays calling upon my people to love instead of hate. For the first time, this subjected me to political conflicts. The German press attacked me, I recieved hate mail, and former friends now distanced themselves from me. I was mistakenly labelled as "anti-war." 
[[Hermann Hesse]]: My family and I moved here in 1912.
 
   
   

Revision as of 18:21, 17 August 2015

Bern-switzerland-river.jpg

Bern is the de facto capital of Switzerland, located on the Aare River. It is the fourth largest city in the country. 

There has been settlement here since approximately the 5th Century BC, though the city of today was founded in the 12th Century. 

Today, Bern is known as one of the most beautiful and enchanting cities in Europe. It is notable for its churches, architecture, history, riverfront, bridges, quality of life, and native bears.



People Born in Bern

coming soon


Bern in People's Lives

Hermann Hesse: My family and I moved here in 1912, directly following my return from a long trip of mine to the near and far east. The voyage had been sparked by a growing distance from my wife, Maria. Now that I had returned, and we had moved here, we both hoped for a fresh start. However, my marital troubles continued. At the outbreak of World War I in 1914, I volunteered to serve in the German Imperial Army. I was, at the time, 37 years old, and said that I could not sit by the fireplace while other young authors were dying on the front. I was found unfit for duty due to an eye condition, but was assigned to caring for prisoners of war. Through out the war, I promoted peace and love in my writings, a stark contrast to most writers of the time. I wrote essays calling upon my people to love instead of hate. For the first time, this subjected me to political conflicts. The German press attacked me, I recieved hate mail, and former friends now distanced themselves from me. I was mistakenly labelled as "anti-war." 


Lists

Most Beautiful Places